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Samba‚Äôs Arrogance Leads to the End of the Yadavas

Samba, a son of Lord Krishna and Jambabati was a handsome young man. He prided himself on his good looks and considered himself to be the best among all sons of Lord Krishna. That he resembled Lord Krishna made him haughtier to such an extent that he became disrespectful to all the guests who were visiting Dwaraka.

On one occasion, Samba made fun of Narada due to his peculiar dressing style. Narada kept quiet considering that as his folly and also keeping in mind that he was Lord Krishna’s son. But the omniscient Lord could know of the incident and got very angry with Samba and cursed him with leprosy, as that would take away his handsomeness which he prides in so much.

Moments later when Samba got affected with leprosy, both, he and his mother Jambabati, got worried and pleaded before Lord Krishna for help. Lord Krishna became considerate and let them know an antidote to the curse. To get rid of leprosy, Samba had to meditate and worship the Sun God at the Chandrabhaga beach (near Konark, Odisha) for 12 year long years. Legend has it that after the Sun God waived off the curse and returned him his original handsomeness, Samba constructed the Sun temple of Konark, now considered as one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

But that episode wasn’t perhaps enough for Samba to learn a lesson. As he regained his handsomeness, he started priding himself on his looks and figure. On one occasion, Narada, Durbasha, and Kanwa Munni came to meet Lord Krishna at Dwaraka. At that time, other sons of Lord Krishna brought Samba in the guise of a pregnant lady and asked the sages to predict the gender of the baby she would deliver.

Samba’s disguise could have fooled the common people to believe that she was a pregnant lady; but the revered sages could make out the fact and felt offended. Especially Durbasha, infamous for his short temper, took the offense so seriously that he cursed the pregnant lady to deliver a block of iron, and he left Dwaraka without meeting Lord Krishna. When Lord Krishna got to know that, he was heartbroken and felt concerned as the whole of Aryabartta knew of such an unpleasant incident by then.

Bhima, the second of Pandavas, promised Lord Krishna that he would grind the iron block to dust. That made Krishna a bit relaxed. When that inopportune moment came, Samba delivered a block of iron. Bhima took that iron block far away from the borders of Dwaraka and rubbed that against metallic stones to dust. He threw the remnant piece to the sea near Prayag Teertha, away from Dwaraka.

But who has the power the change the course of Providence? The entire clan of Yadavas got addicted to alcohol and kept themselves busy in sinister deeds that were quite unbecoming of them.

The place where Bhima grinded the iron block bore a peculiar kind of grass that was strong and sharp like arrows. As luck would have it, the Yadavas in inebriated state followed ‘karala’, a guised animal, that lead them to that place of dangerous grass. They started infighting as the animal vanished and killed one another by attacking with those strands of grass. After that, Lord Krishna became the lone surviving representative of the Yadava dynasty.

On the eve of that unfortunate incident, Lord Krishna foresaw the imminent misfortune and went to Prayag Teertha to seek mental peace far from the madding crowd. By that time, Jara Sabara had got the last piece of iron thrown by Bhima into deep sea during his fishing expedition. He found the piece of iron too sharp and fixed that to his arrow. Considering Lord Krishna’s lotus feet as a deer’s ear, Jara released the arrow and that brought the end of Lord Krishna.

Lessons learnt:

  • Pride goes before a fall.
  • Be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant. – Anonymous